News

Melissa Kish joins NIC team as Director of Education and Leadership Development

Indianapolis, Oct. 16, 2017—Melissa Kish has developed and facilitated student programming across the fraternal and higher education community for more than 10 years and will soon bring this breadth of experience to the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) education team.

Joining staff Nov. 13 as Director of Education and Leadership Development, Kish will manage curriculum design, delivery and assessment for the NIC’s premier and long-standing programming. She will also help shape and execute new programs like PRIME: The Summit of IFC Presidents, being held for the first time in January 2018.

“Melissa’s knowledge of today’s college student and fraternity men will further help the NIC use education to instill meaningful and lasting cultural change in fraternity communities,” said NIC President & CEO Judson Horras. “We look forward to continually elevating future leaders under her perceptive and ardent direction.”

Kish comes to the NIC from Indiana University, where she has served as Associate Director, Leadership & Inclusion and Fraternity & Sorority Life since 2013. During her time at IU, she created the Hoosier Leadership Program and oversaw the fraternity/sorority community of 75 chapters, including four councils—Interfraternity Council (IFC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC) and the Panhellenic Association (PHA)—and over 8,200 students. Kish also previously served as Coordinator and then Assistant Director of Informal Recreation and Special Events at the University of Alabama, where she developed leadership curriculum for campus recreation, athletics, academic schools and housing programs in addition to facilities management responsibilities. While at Alabama, Kish received the Jack Baire Award for Exceptional Leadership and Service.

Extensive volunteer experience has contributed to Kish’s keen understanding of the higher education environment and developmental needs of fraternity and sorority members. She has facilitated more than 25 different student leadership programs for organizations including the AFA, Leadershape, and NIC, and several member fraternities like Zeta Beta Tau, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Pi Kappa Phi and Phi Gamma Delta. She recently won the Campus Partner of the Year Award from Zeta Beta Tau and was honored with the Sigma Phi Epsilon Volunteer Excellence Award in 2013.

“I am a product of the exceptional leadership programs from the NIC and know the impact they can have on individual students, chapters, and communities,” Kish said. “I truly believe the work being done at the NIC is important, innovative, and meaningful. I am excited to join this amazing team and create and enhance experiences that will advance fraternity and sorority on our college campuses.”

Kish is a two-time graduate of Ball State University where she earned her master’s in May 2007 and was a leader for the Indiana Zeta Chapter of Pi Beta Phi. She remains an active Pi Beta Phi volunteer as a Leadership and Nominating Committee Member and Critical Conversations Facilitator, and has worked with 22 chapters and their universities as a Collegiate Risk Management and Policy Specialist. She also serves on the Board of Trustees for Girls, Inc. of Monroe County, Indiana.Indianapolis, Oct. 16, 2017—Melissa Kish has developed and facilitated student programming across the fraternal and higher education community for more than 10 years and will soon bring this breadth of experience to the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) education team.

Joining staff Nov. 13 as Director of Education and Leadership Development, Kish will manage curriculum design, delivery and assessment for the NIC’s premier and long-standing programming. She will also help shape and execute new programs like PRIME: The Summit of IFC Presidents, being held for the first time in January 2018.

Melissa’s knowledge of today’s college student and fraternity men will further help the NIC use education to instill meaningful and lasting cultural change in fraternity communities,” said NIC President & CEO Judson Horras. “We look forward to continually elevating future leaders under her perceptive and ardent direction.”

Kish comes to the NIC from Indiana University, where she has served as Associate Director, Leadership & Inclusion and Fraternity & Sorority Life since 2013. During her time at IU, she created the Hoosier Leadership Program and oversaw the fraternity/sorority community of 75 chapters, including four councils—Interfraternity Council (IFC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC) and the Panhellenic Association (PHA)—and over 8,200 students. Kish also previously served as Coordinator and then Assistant Director of Informal Recreation and Special Events at the University of Alabama, where she developed leadership curriculum for campus recreation, athletics, academic schools and housing programs in addition to facilities management responsibilities. While at Alabama, Kish received the Jack Baire Award for Exceptional Leadership and Service.

Extensive volunteer experience has contributed to Kish’s keen understanding of the higher education environment and developmental needs of fraternity and sorority members. She has facilitated more than 25 different student leadership programs for organizations including the AFA, Leadershape, and NIC, and several member fraternities like Zeta Beta Tau, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Pi Kappa Phi and Phi Gamma Delta. She recently won the Campus Partner of the Year Award from Zeta Beta Tau and was honored with the Sigma Phi Epsilon Volunteer Excellence Award in 2013.

I am a product of the exceptional leadership programs from the NIC and know the impact they can have on individual students, chapters, and communities,” Kish said. “I truly believe the work being done at the NIC is important, innovative, and meaningful. I am excited to join this amazing team and create and enhance experiences that will advance fraternity and sorority on our college campuses.”

Kish is a two-time graduate of Ball State University where she earned her master’s in May 2007 and was a leader for the Indiana Zeta Chapter of Pi Beta Phi. She remains an active Pi Beta Phi volunteer as a Leadership and Nominating Committee Member and Critical Conversations Facilitator, and has worked with 22 chapters and their universities as a Collegiate Risk Management and Policy Specialist. She also serves on the Board of Trustees for Girls, Inc. of Monroe County, Indiana.

NIC adopts enhanced health and safety standards

Sept. 15, 2017—Today, our thoughts and prayers are with Max Gruver’s family and the Louisiana State University community. Our team will be in Baton Rouge this weekend to assist the community during this difficult period.

Last spring, I shared my reflections about the Uncomfortable Truth of working with students today. Recent examples remind us that more rules, policies and enforcement by adults alone isn’t enough to change campus culture. We must utilize the most powerful force for positive change—student leadership, but we need to take strong action to provide guidance and an effective framework for that leadership and governance.

This is why the 66 fraternities of the North American Interfraternity Conference came together at our recent Annual Meeting of Members to pass new, critical health and safety standards that will build upon fraternal prevention efforts and programs.

We had hoped to share this news under different circumstances, but now more than ever, it is important that members and campus partners are aware of the steps fraternities are taking to address key issues facing our communities.

Three important new measures are outlined below:

Implementing Medical Good Samaritan Policies

Nothing should stand in the way of students calling 911 when they or anyone else needs help. A Good Samaritan Policy, which many universities also have in place, encourages students to call for emergency services when someone needs medical attention. By September 1, 2018, each NIC member fraternity will adopt and implement a medical Good Samaritan policy.

Raising the Bar for Health and Safety Programming

Preventing alcohol abuse, hazing and sexual misconduct takes comprehensive efforts grounded in education. By establishing a more robust baseline, we can better ensure all fraternities are educating their chapters and members using best-practice programs around health and safety. By September 1, 2018, NIC member fraternities will implement annual baseline health and safety educational programs for all chapters. This enhances previous NIC health and safety education standards already in place.

Addressing Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse is a serious public health problem on college campuses, and fraternities must provide greater leadership in this area. This is why fraternities came together to support a pilot program that empowers the NIC to work with campuses to achieve the following goals:

  • Remove dangerous hard alcohol from the fraternity experience
  • Provide a more balanced, academic-centered fraternity experience
  • Foster safer social events for members and guests

This pilot approach blends policy rooted in research, best practices in educational programming, enhanced procedures to make events safer, and a commitment to measure the efficacy of these interventions through consistent assessment. Most critical—this approach also acknowledges that positive change happens when it’s embraced by all stakeholders at the local level through collaboration and customization.

In fall 2017, the NIC will identify pilot campuses, develop Social Safe procedures, and secure an assessment partner. In spring 2018, the NIC will work with a limited group of pilot campuses to implement these new standards and measure their effectiveness. Reach out if your campus would like to be considered for study.

We are all in this together, and I firmly believe that people united around a common purpose can do greater good together than on their own. We appreciate your continued partnership and look forward to working with you during the 2017-2018 school year, and beyond.

Judson Horras
NIC President & CEOSept. 15, 2017—Today, our thoughts and prayers are with Max Gruver’s family and the Louisiana State University community. Our team will be in Baton Rouge this weekend to assist the community during this difficult period.

Last spring, I shared my reflections about the Uncomfortable Truth of working with students today. Recent examples remind us that more rules, policies and enforcement by adults alone isn’t enough to change campus culture. We must utilize the most powerful force for positive change—student leadership, but we need to take strong action to provide guidance and an effective framework for that leadership and governance.

This is why the 66 fraternities of the North American Interfraternity Conference came together at our recent Annual Meeting of Members to pass new, critical health and safety standards that will build upon fraternal prevention efforts and programs.

We had hoped to share this news under different circumstances, but now more than ever, it is important that members and campus partners are aware of the steps fraternities are taking to address key issues facing our communities.

Three important new measures are outlined below:

Implementing Medical Good Samaritan Policies

Nothing should stand in the way of students calling 911 when they or anyone else needs help. A Good Samaritan Policy, which many universities also have in place, encourages students to call for emergency services when someone needs medical attention. By September 1, 2018, each NIC member fraternity will adopt and implement a medical Good Samaritan policy.

Raising the Bar for Health and Safety Programming

Preventing alcohol abuse, hazing and sexual misconduct takes comprehensive efforts grounded in education. By establishing a more robust baseline, we can better ensure all fraternities are educating their chapters and members using best-practice programs around health and safety. By September 1, 2018, NIC member fraternities will implement annual baseline health and safety educational programs for all chapters. This enhances previous NIC health and safety education standards already in place.

Addressing Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse is a serious public health problem on college campuses, and fraternities must provide greater leadership in this area. This is why fraternities came together to support a pilot program that empowers the NIC to work with campuses to achieve the following goals:

  • Remove dangerous hard alcohol from the fraternity experience
  • Provide a more balanced, academic-centered fraternity experience
  • Foster safer social events for members and guests

This pilot approach blends policy rooted in research, best practices in educational programming, enhanced procedures to make events safer, and a commitment to measure the efficacy of these interventions through consistent assessment. Most critical—this approach also acknowledges that positive change happens when it’s embraced by all stakeholders at the local level through collaboration and customization.

In fall 2017, the NIC will identify pilot campuses, develop Social Safe procedures, and secure an assessment partner. In spring 2018, the NIC will work with a limited group of pilot campuses to implement these new standards and measure their effectiveness. Reach out if your campus would like to be considered for study.

We are all in this together, and I firmly believe that people united around a common purpose can do greater good together than on their own. We appreciate your continued partnership and look forward to working with you during the 2017-2018 school year, and beyond.

Judson Horras
NIC President & CEO

Fraternal “umbrella” organizations unanimously support new anti-hazing legislation

Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.) and Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio) Introduce the Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act

Contact:
Heather Kirk, Chief Communication Officer
heather.kirk@nicfraternity.org

WASHINGTON, July 13, 2017—Officials from the National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC), National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. (NPHC), National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO), National Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Panhellenic Association (NAPA), National Multicultural Greek Council (NMGC), and Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (AFA), issued the following statements today endorsing anti-hazing legislation introduced by Rep. Patrick Meehan, R-Pa., and Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio.

The Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act would require colleges and universities to disclose information about hazing on campus in their annual crime reports. It would also require any college or university that accepts federal funding to provide hazing prevention education to all students.

This united support for the REACH Act comes from all the fraternal “umbrella” organizations, which collectively represent more than 140 fraternities and sororities, as well as the association that provides development to professionals who work with fraternities and sororities.

Statement from the National Panhellenic Conference

“Students have long had access to accurate and timely information about security issues on campus, and they deserve the same transparency about incidents of hazing,” said Dani Weatherford, NPC Executive Director, on behalf of the organization’s Board of Directors.

“No single piece of legislation can eradicate hazing on campus, but it can ensure that students, administrators and parents have access to the tools and information they need to hold organizations and campuses accountable. The battle against hazing is not a problem for fraternities alone, but a call-to-action for all campus-based organizations – including the sorority community. We stand with elected leaders, campus officials and students nationwide as committed partners in this fight.”

Statement from the North American Interfraternity Conference

“Research shows hazing prevention is best accomplished through comprehensive measures, including proactive education, transparency and accountability around standards,” said NIC President and CEO Judson Horras. “The North-American Interfraternity Conference backs the REACH Act because it focuses on these critical strategies. NIC member fraternities stand united in providing positive, hazing-free, meaningful rites of passage that strengthen and develop young men.”

Statement from the National Pan-Hellenic Council

“The Council of Presidents of the National Pan-Hellenic Council commends the bipartisan leadership of Rep. Pat Meehan and Rep. Marcia Fudge and supports the objectives of the REACH Act,” said Dr. Paulette C. Walker, Chair of the NPHC Council of Presidents and National President of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

“The organizations of the NPHC are resolute in the commitment to nurture the ideals of sisterhood and fraternalism and uphold the dignity and self-respect of all persons seeking membership in the respective organizations,” said Jennifer Jones, NPHC President. “Hazing is antithetical to this commitment. NPHC organizations collaborate with universities regarding hazing concerns and believe that university-sponsored hazing education and annual reporting of hazing incidents will be important tools in a more comprehensive and proactive approach to combat hazing.”

Statement from the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations

“Many of our members—first- and second-gen students—are sent to college by parents unfamiliar with the traditions that occur at some universities. Our students look for places of belonging and trust that universities are doing their best to prevent harm to their students,” said NALFO President Maria Diaz.

“Through our shared standards and membership requirement for each organization to have clear anti-hazing policies, NALFO strives to assure that each student is able to participate in our organizations’ traditions in a safe and supportive way. The REACH Act will arm our students and parents with access to information that will help them make an informed decision on what institution to entrust with their well-being.”

Statement from the National Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Panhellenic Association

“NAPA strictly opposes hazing and any activities that do not contribute to the positive development and welfare of potential new members and initiated members,” said NAPA’s Executive Board. “In solidarity with our fellow umbrella organizations, we believe the REACH Act will support our commitment to empowering our member organizations to operate with the safety and sustainability of their members as a top priority.”

Statement from the National Multicultural Greek Council

“The National Multicultural Greek Council organizations each dedicate substantial time and resources to improving the lives of individuals and bettering their communities,” said NMGC President Jen Rencher. “Accordingly, a membership intake process that utilizes and/or condones acts of hazing is contrary to the mission and purpose of the NMGC and its Member Organizations. As such, we support the REACH Act for providing transparency about hazing incidents and education on how to combat it for the campus community.”

Statement from the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors

“Hazing on college campuses is a complex problem and addressing it requires a multi-faceted approach,” said Lynda Wiley, Executive Director of AFA. “A combination of information, education and accountability is necessary to eliminate this behavior. Including hazing information in Clery reporting will help students and parents as they ask important questions related to joining a variety of organizations, including fraternities and sororities. AFA is committed to continual professional education for our members and would provide training around implementation of the REACH Act if it becomes law.”

Click here to learn more about the REACH Act.

 

###

About the National Panhellenic Conference
NPC is the umbrella organization specifically charged with advocating on behalf of the sorority experience. It is comprised of 26 national and international sororities that are autonomous social organizations. Collectively, NPC sororities are located on more than 670 campuses with approximately 380,000 undergraduate members and more than 4.5 million alumnae.

About the North American Interfraternity Conference
Founded in 1909, the NIC is the trade association that represents a diverse range of inter/national men’s fraternities, including historically black, multicultural and emerging organizations. NIC’s 66 member organizations boast more than 6,100 chapters located on more than 800 campuses in the United States and Canada, with approximately 380,000 undergraduate members and nearly 4.2 million alumni.

About the National Pan-Hellenic Council
NPHC is comprised of local councils drawn from the ranks of 1.5 million college and professional members of the nine historically African-American fraternities and sororities, namely: Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.; Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.; Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.; Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.; Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.; Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.; Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.; Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.; and Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.; and the Council of Presidents of these member organizations who come together on issues that promote the common purposes and general good for which these organizations exist.

About the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations
NALFO is the coalition of 16 Latina/o based sororities and fraternities in the United States. NALFO exists to unite and empower its Latino organizations and their communities through advocacy, cultural awareness and organizational development while fostering positive interfraternal relationships and collaborating on issues of mutual interest.

About the National Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Panhellenic Association
NAPA shares a commitment to fraternal unity and assisting our membership in advancing the fraternal experience. Formally organized in 2006, NAPA currently is comprised of 18 culturally-based member organizations.

About the National Multicultural Greek Council
NMGC is an umbrella council for a coalition of Multicultural Greek-Letter Organizations (MGLOs), established in 1998. The purpose of NMGC is to provide a forum that allows for the free exchange of ideas, programs and services between its constituent fraternities and sororities; to promote the awareness of multicultural diversity within collegiate institutions, their surrounding communities, and the greater community-at-large, and to support and promote the works of its member organizations.

About the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors
Through programs, publications, networking opportunities and other resources, AFA represents the community of campus-based fraternity and sorority advisors and is the leading voice in aligning the fraternity/sorority and higher education experiences.

Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.) and Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio) Introduce the Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act

Contact:
Heather Kirk, Chief Communication Officer
heather.kirk@nicfraternity.org

WASHINGTON, July 13, 2017—Officials from the National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC), National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. (NPHC), National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO), National Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Panhellenic Association (NAPA), National Multicultural Greek Council (NMGC), and Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (AFA), issued the following statements today endorsing anti-hazing legislation introduced by Rep. Patrick Meehan, R-Pa., and Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio.

The Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act would require colleges and universities to disclose information about hazing on campus in their annual crime reports. It would also require any college or university that accepts federal funding to provide hazing prevention education to all students.

This united support for the REACH Act comes from all the fraternal “umbrella” organizations, which collectively represent more than 140 fraternities and sororities, as well as the association that provides development to professionals who work with fraternities and sororities.

Statement from the National Panhellenic Conference

“Students have long had access to accurate and timely information about security issues on campus, and they deserve the same transparency about incidents of hazing,” said Dani Weatherford, NPC Executive Director, on behalf of the organization’s Board of Directors.

“No single piece of legislation can eradicate hazing on campus, but it can ensure that students, administrators and parents have access to the tools and information they need to hold organizations and campuses accountable. The battle against hazing is not a problem for fraternities alone, but a call-to-action for all campus-based organizations – including the sorority community. We stand with elected leaders, campus officials and students nationwide as committed partners in this fight.”

Statement from the North American Interfraternity Conference

“Research shows hazing prevention is best accomplished through comprehensive measures, including proactive education, transparency and accountability around standards,” said NIC President and CEO Judson Horras. “The North-American Interfraternity Conference backs the REACH Act because it focuses on these critical strategies. NIC member fraternities stand united in providing positive, hazing-free, meaningful rites of passage that strengthen and develop young men.”

Statement from the National Pan-Hellenic Council

“The Council of Presidents of the National Pan-Hellenic Council commends the bipartisan leadership of Rep. Pat Meehan and Rep. Marcia Fudge and supports the objectives of the REACH Act,” said Dr. Paulette C. Walker, Chair of the NPHC Council of Presidents and National President of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

“The organizations of the NPHC are resolute in the commitment to nurture the ideals of sisterhood and fraternalism and uphold the dignity and self-respect of all persons seeking membership in the respective organizations,” said Jennifer Jones, NPHC President. “Hazing is antithetical to this commitment. NPHC organizations collaborate with universities regarding hazing concerns and believe that university-sponsored hazing education and annual reporting of hazing incidents will be important tools in a more comprehensive and proactive approach to combat hazing.”

Statement from the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations

“Many of our members—first- and second-gen students—are sent to college by parents unfamiliar with the traditions that occur at some universities. Our students look for places of belonging and trust that universities are doing their best to prevent harm to their students,” said NALFO President Maria Diaz.

“Through our shared standards and membership requirement for each organization to have clear anti-hazing policies, NALFO strives to assure that each student is able to participate in our organizations’ traditions in a safe and supportive way. The REACH Act will arm our students and parents with access to information that will help them make an informed decision on what institution to entrust with their well-being.”

Statement from the National Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Panhellenic Association

“NAPA strictly opposes hazing and any activities that do not contribute to the positive development and welfare of potential new members and initiated members,” said NAPA’s Executive Board. “In solidarity with our fellow umbrella organizations, we believe the REACH Act will support our commitment to empowering our member organizations to operate with the safety and sustainability of their members as a top priority.”

Statement from the National Multicultural Greek Council

“The National Multicultural Greek Council organizations each dedicate substantial time and resources to improving the lives of individuals and bettering their communities,” said NMGC President Jen Rencher. “Accordingly, a membership intake process that utilizes and/or condones acts of hazing is contrary to the mission and purpose of the NMGC and its Member Organizations. As such, we support the REACH Act for providing transparency about hazing incidents and education on how to combat it for the campus community.”

Statement from the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors

“Hazing on college campuses is a complex problem and addressing it requires a multi-faceted approach,” said Lynda Wiley, Executive Director of AFA. “A combination of information, education and accountability is necessary to eliminate this behavior. Including hazing information in Clery reporting will help students and parents as they ask important questions related to joining a variety of organizations, including fraternities and sororities. AFA is committed to continual professional education for our members and would provide training around implementation of the REACH Act if it becomes law.”

Click here to learn more about the REACH Act.

 

###

About the National Panhellenic Conference
NPC is the umbrella organization specifically charged with advocating on behalf of the sorority experience. It is comprised of 26 national and international sororities that are autonomous social organizations. Collectively, NPC sororities are located on more than 670 campuses with approximately 380,000 undergraduate members and more than 4.5 million alumnae.

About the North American Interfraternity Conference
Founded in 1909, the NIC is the trade association that represents a diverse range of inter/national men’s fraternities, including historically black, multicultural and emerging organizations. NIC’s 66 member organizations boast more than 6,100 chapters located on more than 800 campuses in the United States and Canada, with approximately 380,000 undergraduate members and nearly 4.2 million alumni.

About the National Pan-Hellenic Council
NPHC is comprised of local councils drawn from the ranks of 1.5 million college and professional members of the nine historically African-American fraternities and sororities, namely: Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.; Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.; Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.; Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.; Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.; Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.; Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.; Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.; and Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.; and the Council of Presidents of these member organizations who come together on issues that promote the common purposes and general good for which these organizations exist.

About the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations
NALFO is the coalition of 16 Latina/o based sororities and fraternities in the United States. NALFO exists to unite and empower its Latino organizations and their communities through advocacy, cultural awareness and organizational development while fostering positive interfraternal relationships and collaborating on issues of mutual interest.

About the National Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Panhellenic Association
NAPA shares a commitment to fraternal unity and assisting our membership in advancing the fraternal experience. Formally organized in 2006, NAPA currently is comprised of 18 culturally-based member organizations.

About the National Multicultural Greek Council
NMGC is an umbrella council for a coalition of Multicultural Greek-Letter Organizations (MGLOs), established in 1998. The purpose of NMGC is to provide a forum that allows for the free exchange of ideas, programs and services between its constituent fraternities and sororities; to promote the awareness of multicultural diversity within collegiate institutions, their surrounding communities, and the greater community-at-large, and to support and promote the works of its member organizations.

About the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors
Through programs, publications, networking opportunities and other resources, AFA represents the community of campus-based fraternity and sorority advisors and is the leading voice in aligning the fraternity/sorority and higher education experiences.

Helen Lahrman and Dylan Howser join NIC Campus Support team

Indianapolis, July 10, 2017—Two skilled interfraternal professionals will soon add their knowledge for fraternity excellence and operations to the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) Campus Support team.

Helen Lahrman, Vice President of Campus Operations, Midwest

Beginning August 1, Helen Lahrman will serve as Vice President of Campus Operations for the Midwest, where she will focus on undergraduate development, alumni engagement and council effectiveness in partnership with campuses in the region. She will work from her home in Dallas, Texas, where she will be accessible to the campuses she serves.

Lahrman comes to the NIC from The University of Iowa, where she served as the Assistant Director for Fraternity and Sorority Life Programs. In this role, she oversaw the ever-growing Iowa fraternity and sorority community comprised of 53 organizations, four councils and 4,000 students.

“Helen’s expertise in working with and developing high-performing councils will be an incredible asset to the Campus Support team,” said NIC President & CEO Judson Horras.

Lahrman previously held the positions of Coordinator of Greek Life and Community Engagement at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, as well as Greek Life and Leadership Advisor at University of Colorado Colorado Springs (UCCS). While at Northeastern, she assisted in developing the campus Multicultural Greek Council and revitalizing the National Pan-Hellenic Council. In 2014, she received the Rising Star Award by a vote of fellow staff members.

“I firmly believe in the direction the NIC is heading,” Lahrman said. “I’m looking forward to the fast-paced work environment and building relationships with IFCs, alumni and member organizations.”

Lahrman earned a Bachelor of Arts in public relations and marketing from Franklin College, where she became a member of Pi Beta Phi and played varsity basketball. She earned a Master of Arts in educational leadership from UCCS.

Lahrman also has extensive fraternal volunteer experience. She currently serves as a Pi Beta Phi international officer and previously spent six years advising collegiate chapters. She is a member of the Delta Upsilon Men of Merit Committee, an active member of the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (AFA), and a past Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute (UIFI) facilitator.

Dylan Howser, Vice President of Campus Operations, Berkeley

Through a unique partnership with the University of California, Berkeley Administration and Interfraternity Council (IFC), Howser will facilitate stronger fraternity relationships with Berkeley community residents, provide dedicated IFC support and develop an Alumni IFC to bolster support for all chapters.

“The NIC is excited to have Dylan lead this five-year partnership with Berkeley’s key stakeholders as they undergo significant community culture building,” Horras said.

Howser’s work will build upon his relationships within the Berkeley fraternity community, where he has worked for three years as the LEAD Center Coordinator for Fraternity & Sorority Advising and Leadership Development. He advised IFC fraternities and assisted in developing curriculum on diversity, risk management and prevention, and new member education.

“I am excited about this new collaborative role with the IFC at Berkeley, so I can continue to serve them in their efforts to create a more safe and inclusive experience,” he said. “I believe NIC 2.0 is one of the best vehicles to help move this community forward as it has many talented professionals and volunteers, and I look forward to learning from them.”

Howser earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Millikin University, where he was IFC President. He earned a Master of Education in college student affairs from The Pennsylvania State University, where he co-advised the IFC and the Panhellenic Association as a graduate assistant. Howser is a member of Delta Sigma Phi and has experience facilitating the NIC’s UIFI and IMPACT programs, as well as LeaderShape, the CalGreeks Leadership Summit and the Intersect Conference.Indianapolis, July 10, 2017—Two skilled interfraternal professionals will soon add their knowledge for fraternity excellence and operations to the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) Campus Support team.

Helen Lahrman, Vice President of Campus Operations, Midwest

Beginning August 1, Helen Lahrman will serve as Vice President of Campus Operations for the Midwest, where she will focus on undergraduate development, alumni engagement and council effectiveness in partnership with campuses in the region. She will work from her home in Dallas, Texas, where she will be accessible to the campuses she serves.

Lahrman comes to the NIC from The University of Iowa, where she served as the Assistant Director for Fraternity and Sorority Life Programs. In this role, she oversaw the ever-growing Iowa fraternity and sorority community comprised of 53 organizations, four councils and 4,000 students.

Helen’s expertise in working with and developing high-performing councils will be an incredible asset to the Campus Support team,” said NIC President & CEO Judson Horras.

Lahrman previously held the positions of Coordinator of Greek Life and Community Engagement at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, as well as Greek Life and Leadership Advisor at University of Colorado Colorado Springs (UCCS). While at Northeastern, she assisted in developing the campus Multicultural Greek Council and revitalizing the National Pan-Hellenic Council. In 2014, she received the Rising Star Award by a vote of fellow staff members.

I firmly believe in the direction the NIC is heading,” Lahrman said. “I’m looking forward to the fast-paced work environment and building relationships with IFCs, alumni and member organizations.”

Lahrman earned a Bachelor of Arts in public relations and marketing from Franklin College, where she became a member of Pi Beta Phi and played varsity basketball. She earned a Master of Arts in educational leadership from UCCS.

Lahrman also has extensive fraternal volunteer experience. She currently serves as a Pi Beta Phi international officer and previously spent six years advising collegiate chapters. She is a member of the Delta Upsilon Men of Merit Committee, an active member of the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (AFA), and a past Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute (UIFI) facilitator.

Dylan Howser, Vice President of Campus Operations, Berkeley

Through a unique partnership with the University of California, Berkeley Administration and Interfraternity Council (IFC), Howser will facilitate stronger fraternity relationships with Berkeley community residents, provide dedicated IFC support and develop an Alumni IFC to bolster support for all chapters.

The NIC is excited to have Dylan lead this five-year partnership with Berkeley’s key stakeholders as they undergo significant community culture building,” Horras said.

Howser’s work will build upon his relationships within the Berkeley fraternity community, where he has worked for three years as the LEAD Center Coordinator for Fraternity & Sorority Advising and Leadership Development. He advised IFC fraternities and assisted in developing curriculum on diversity, risk management and prevention, and new member education.

I am excited about this new collaborative role with the IFC at Berkeley, so I can continue to serve them in their efforts to create a more safe and inclusive experience,” he said. “I believe NIC 2.0 is one of the best vehicles to help move this community forward as it has many talented professionals and volunteers, and I look forward to learning from them.”

Howser earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Millikin University, where he was IFC President. He earned a Master of Education in college student affairs from The Pennsylvania State University, where he co-advised the IFC and the Panhellenic Association as a graduate assistant. Howser is a member of Delta Sigma Phi and has experience facilitating the NIC’s UIFI and IMPACT programs, as well as LeaderShape, the CalGreeks Leadership Summit and the Intersect Conference.

NIC backs anti-hazing legislation

Indianapolis, June 19, 2017—The North American Interfraternity Conference strongly supports the Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act of 2017, bipartisan anti-hazing legislation introduced by Rep. Pat Meehan (R-Pa.) and co-sponsored by Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio).

The REACH Act would add hazing as misconduct/crime reported under the Clery Act, requiring colleges and universities to disclose hazing incidents in their Annual Security Report. It would also require any college or university that accepts federal funding to provide hazing prevention education and resources to students.

“Research shows hazing prevention is best accomplished through comprehensive measures, including proactive education, transparency, and accountability around standards,” said NIC President and CEO Judson Horras. “The North American Interfraternity Conference backs the REACH Act because it focuses on these critical strategies.”

Hazing has no place in the fraternity experience. The NIC has reached out to other interfraternal organizations to discuss the bill and is hopeful we will garner additional support across the fraternal movement. In addition to support of this legislation, NIC fraternities will continue the fight against hazing through policy education, prevention and accountability measures.

“NIC member fraternities stand united in providing positive, hazing-free, meaningful rites of passage that strengthen and develop young men,” said Horras. “We commend co-sponsors Reps. Meehan and Fudge for their leadership in facing this problem.”

Click here to learn more about the REACH Act.Indianapolis, June 19, 2017—The North American Interfraternity Conference strongly supports the Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act of 2017, bipartisan anti-hazing legislation introduced by Rep. Pat Meehan (R-Pa.) and co-sponsored by Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio).

The REACH Act would add hazing as misconduct/crime reported under the Clery Act, requiring colleges and universities to disclose hazing incidents in their Annual Security Report. It would also require any college or university that accepts federal funding to provide hazing prevention education and resources to students.

Research shows hazing prevention is best accomplished through comprehensive measures, including proactive education, transparency, and accountability around standards,” said NIC President and CEO Judson Horras. “The North American Interfraternity Conference backs the REACH Act because it focuses on these critical strategies.”

Hazing has no place in the fraternity experience. The NIC has reached out to other interfraternal organizations to discuss the bill and is hopeful we will garner additional support across the fraternal movement. In addition to support of this legislation, NIC fraternities will continue the fight against hazing through policy education, prevention and accountability measures.

NIC member fraternities stand united in providing positive, hazing-free, meaningful rites of passage that strengthen and develop young men,” said Horras. “We commend co-sponsors Reps. Meehan and Fudge for their leadership in facing this problem.”

Click here to learn more about the REACH Act.

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