Standards

NIC fraternities ban hard alcohol in decisive action

Indianapolis—In an important, decisive action to enhance health and safety in fraternity communities, the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) recently adopted a Standard prohibiting hard alcohol from fraternity chapter facilities and events.

At its Aug. 27 Annual Meeting in a near unanimous vote of its 66 inter/national fraternities, the Conference determined that each organization will implement the new Standard by Sept. 1, 2019, across their more than 6,100 chapters on 800 campuses.

“At their core, fraternities are about brotherhood, personal development and providing a community of support. Alcohol abuse and its serious consequences endanger this very purpose,” said Judson Horras, NIC President & CEO. “This action shows fraternities’ clear commitment and leadership to further their focus on the safety of members and all in our communities.”

This is the latest in a series of NIC Health & Safety Initiatives launched in the last year, including Conference-wide adoption of medical Good Samaritan policies; piloting further measures to reduce alcohol; developing SocialSafe, an online event management platform and app; testing measures to reduce hazing in the new member experience; and advocating for stronger anti-hazing laws.

“Our IFC and member fraternities eliminated hard alcohol from facilities and events on our campus several years ago and have seen a positive shift in our culture when it comes to the health and safety of our members and guests,” said Seth Gutwein, Purdue University IFC President. “With all NIC fraternities implementing this critical change, it will provide strong support for fraternities to move as one to make campus communities safer.”

Under the resolution passed by the Conference, each NIC member fraternity will “adopt and implement a policy by September 1, 2019, that prohibits the presence of alcohol products above 15% ABV in any chapter facility or at any chapter event, except when served by a licensed third-party vendor. Chapter facilities and events outside the United States may have one additional year to achieve compliance. Any member fraternity that does not have a business meeting between Sept. 1, 2018, and Sept. 1, 2019, will be granted a one-year extension in adoption.” As with all NIC Standards, this is a minimum expectation; when member fraternities and campuses have more restrictive policies, students and chapters will still be expected to follow those.

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Click here for more information, including Frequently Asked Questions. The North American Interfraternity Conference is a trade association that represents 66 inter/national men’s fraternities, with more than 6,100 chapters located on more than 800 campuses in the United States and Canada, with approximately 385,000 undergraduate members and nearly 4.2 million alumni.Indianapolis—In an important, decisive action to enhance health and safety in fraternity communities, the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) recently adopted a Standard prohibiting hard alcohol from fraternity chapter facilities and events.

At its Aug. 27 Annual Meeting in a near unanimous vote of its 66 inter/national fraternities, the Conference determined that each organization will implement the new Standard by Sept. 1, 2019, across their more than 6,100 chapters on 800 campuses.

“At their core, fraternities are about brotherhood, personal development and providing a community of support. Alcohol abuse and its serious consequences endanger this very purpose,” said Judson Horras, NIC President & CEO. “This action shows fraternities’ clear commitment and leadership to further their focus on the safety of members and all in our communities.”

This is the latest in a series of NIC Health & Safety Initiatives launched in the last year, including Conference-wide adoption of medical Good Samaritan policies; piloting further measures to reduce alcohol; developing SocialSafe, an online event management platform and app; testing measures to reduce hazing in the new member experience; and advocating for stronger anti-hazing laws.

Our IFC and member fraternities eliminated hard alcohol from facilities and events on our campus several years ago and have seen a positive shift in our culture when it comes to the health and safety of our members and guests,” said Seth Gutwein, Purdue University IFC President. “With all NIC fraternities implementing this critical change, it will provide strong support for fraternities to move as one to make campus communities safer.”

Under the resolution passed by the Conference, each NIC member fraternity will “adopt and implement a policy by September 1, 2019, that prohibits the presence of alcohol products above 15% ABV in any chapter facility or at any chapter event, except when served by a licensed third-party vendor. Chapter facilities and events outside the United States may have one additional year to achieve compliance. Any member fraternity that does not have a business meeting between Sept. 1, 2018, and Sept. 1, 2019, will be granted a one-year extension in adoption.” As with all NIC Standards, this is a minimum expectation; when member fraternities and campuses have more restrictive policies, students and chapters will still be expected to follow those.

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Click here for more information, including Frequently Asked Questions. The North American Interfraternity Conference is a trade association that represents 66 inter/national men’s fraternities, with more than 6,100 chapters located on more than 800 campuses in the United States and Canada, with approximately 385,000 undergraduate members and nearly 4.2 million alumni.

NIC philosophy and guidance on community-wide actions

The Open Letter we shared in March outlined the Conference’s position on community-wide, blanket actions, and its guidance still holds true today. Here is some additional, important information on our philosophy:

The NIC applauds recent student-led actions that aim to tackle critical issues on college campuses, such as alcohol and substance abuse, hazing and sexual misconduct.

IFCs considering collective action should follow guidelines to address behaviors that risk the health and safety of their community members.

Alcohol abuse on college campuses is a public health concern, and a consistent, campus-wide approach helps address this concern—both in fraternity communities and beyond.

The NIC supports campus-administered restrictions that limit access to alcohol if the policies are equally applied across all student organizations. We applaud President Thrasher’s recent decision to eliminate events with alcohol for all 700 student organizations at Florida State University.

The NIC will vigorously advocate for the rights of students to assemble in ways that develop their personal and intellectual growth.

Chapter study groups, service and philanthropy projects, business meetings, spiritual gatherings, prevention programs, or alcohol-free social interactions should not be limited as these experiences positively impact a student’s development.

In the wake of a tragic loss in a community, fraternity men and the NIC are prepared to work closely with our campus partners, students and alumni to respond appropriately in such a challenging and difficult time.

Now more than ever, students, alumni, community members, national organizations, and university administrators must come together to create ownership and accountability toward measures for change. We know critical issues that are deeply rooted in culture aren’t going to be solved with quick fixes. It is going to take intentional collaboration and comprehensive strategies.The Open Letter we shared in March outlined the Conference’s position on community-wide, blanket actions, and its guidance still holds true today. Here is some additional, important information on our philosophy:

The NIC applauds recent student-led actions that aim to tackle critical issues on college campuses, such as alcohol and substance abuse, hazing and sexual misconduct.

IFCs considering collective action should follow guidelines to address behaviors that risk the health and safety of their community members.

Alcohol abuse on college campuses is a public health concern, and a consistent, campus-wide approach helps address this concern—both in fraternity communities and beyond.

The NIC supports campus-administered restrictions that limit access to alcohol if the policies are equally applied across all student organizations. We applaud President Thrasher’s recent decision to eliminate events with alcohol for all 700 student organizations at Florida State University.

The NIC will vigorously advocate for the rights of students to assemble in ways that develop their personal and intellectual growth.

Chapter study groups, service and philanthropy projects, business meetings, spiritual gatherings, prevention programs, or alcohol-free social interactions should not be limited as these experiences positively impact a student’s development.

In the wake of a tragic loss in a community, fraternity men and the NIC are prepared to work closely with our campus partners, students and alumni to respond appropriately in such a challenging and difficult time.

Now more than ever, students, alumni, community members, national organizations, and university administrators must come together to create ownership and accountability toward measures for change. We know critical issues that are deeply rooted in culture aren’t going to be solved with quick fixes. It is going to take intentional collaboration and comprehensive strategies.

NIC adopts enhanced health and safety standards

Sept. 15, 2017—Today, our thoughts and prayers are with Max Gruver’s family and the Louisiana State University community. Our team will be in Baton Rouge this weekend to assist the community during this difficult period.

Last spring, I shared my reflections about the Uncomfortable Truth of working with students today. Recent examples remind us that more rules, policies and enforcement by adults alone isn’t enough to change campus culture. We must utilize the most powerful force for positive change—student leadership, but we need to take strong action to provide guidance and an effective framework for that leadership and governance.

This is why the 66 fraternities of the North American Interfraternity Conference came together at our recent Annual Meeting of Members to pass new, critical health and safety standards that will build upon fraternal prevention efforts and programs.

We had hoped to share this news under different circumstances, but now more than ever, it is important that members and campus partners are aware of the steps fraternities are taking to address key issues facing our communities.

Three important new measures are outlined below:

Implementing Medical Good Samaritan Policies

Nothing should stand in the way of students calling 911 when they or anyone else needs help. A Good Samaritan Policy, which many universities also have in place, encourages students to call for emergency services when someone needs medical attention. By September 1, 2018, each NIC member fraternity will adopt and implement a medical Good Samaritan policy.

Raising the Bar for Health and Safety Programming

Preventing alcohol abuse, hazing and sexual misconduct takes comprehensive efforts grounded in education. By establishing a more robust baseline, we can better ensure all fraternities are educating their chapters and members using best-practice programs around health and safety. By September 1, 2018, NIC member fraternities will implement annual baseline health and safety educational programs for all chapters. This enhances previous NIC health and safety education standards already in place.

Addressing Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse is a serious public health problem on college campuses, and fraternities must provide greater leadership in this area. This is why fraternities came together to support a pilot program that empowers the NIC to work with campuses to achieve the following goals:

  • Remove dangerous hard alcohol from the fraternity experience
  • Provide a more balanced, academic-centered fraternity experience
  • Foster safer social events for members and guests

This pilot approach blends policy rooted in research, best practices in educational programming, enhanced procedures to make events safer, and a commitment to measure the efficacy of these interventions through consistent assessment. Most critical—this approach also acknowledges that positive change happens when it’s embraced by all stakeholders at the local level through collaboration and customization.

In fall 2017, the NIC will identify pilot campuses, develop Social Safe procedures, and secure an assessment partner. In spring 2018, the NIC will work with a limited group of pilot campuses to implement these new standards and measure their effectiveness. Reach out if your campus would like to be considered for study.

We are all in this together, and I firmly believe that people united around a common purpose can do greater good together than on their own. We appreciate your continued partnership and look forward to working with you during the 2017-2018 school year, and beyond.

Judson Horras
NIC President & CEOSept. 15, 2017—Today, our thoughts and prayers are with Max Gruver’s family and the Louisiana State University community. Our team will be in Baton Rouge this weekend to assist the community during this difficult period.

Last spring, I shared my reflections about the Uncomfortable Truth of working with students today. Recent examples remind us that more rules, policies and enforcement by adults alone isn’t enough to change campus culture. We must utilize the most powerful force for positive change—student leadership, but we need to take strong action to provide guidance and an effective framework for that leadership and governance.

This is why the 66 fraternities of the North American Interfraternity Conference came together at our recent Annual Meeting of Members to pass new, critical health and safety standards that will build upon fraternal prevention efforts and programs.

We had hoped to share this news under different circumstances, but now more than ever, it is important that members and campus partners are aware of the steps fraternities are taking to address key issues facing our communities.

Three important new measures are outlined below:

Implementing Medical Good Samaritan Policies

Nothing should stand in the way of students calling 911 when they or anyone else needs help. A Good Samaritan Policy, which many universities also have in place, encourages students to call for emergency services when someone needs medical attention. By September 1, 2018, each NIC member fraternity will adopt and implement a medical Good Samaritan policy.

Raising the Bar for Health and Safety Programming

Preventing alcohol abuse, hazing and sexual misconduct takes comprehensive efforts grounded in education. By establishing a more robust baseline, we can better ensure all fraternities are educating their chapters and members using best-practice programs around health and safety. By September 1, 2018, NIC member fraternities will implement annual baseline health and safety educational programs for all chapters. This enhances previous NIC health and safety education standards already in place.

Addressing Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse is a serious public health problem on college campuses, and fraternities must provide greater leadership in this area. This is why fraternities came together to support a pilot program that empowers the NIC to work with campuses to achieve the following goals:

  • Remove dangerous hard alcohol from the fraternity experience
  • Provide a more balanced, academic-centered fraternity experience
  • Foster safer social events for members and guests

This pilot approach blends policy rooted in research, best practices in educational programming, enhanced procedures to make events safer, and a commitment to measure the efficacy of these interventions through consistent assessment. Most critical—this approach also acknowledges that positive change happens when it’s embraced by all stakeholders at the local level through collaboration and customization.

In fall 2017, the NIC will identify pilot campuses, develop Social Safe procedures, and secure an assessment partner. In spring 2018, the NIC will work with a limited group of pilot campuses to implement these new standards and measure their effectiveness. Reach out if your campus would like to be considered for study.

We are all in this together, and I firmly believe that people united around a common purpose can do greater good together than on their own. We appreciate your continued partnership and look forward to working with you during the 2017-2018 school year, and beyond.

Judson Horras
NIC President & CEO

North American Interfraternity Conference passes landmark reforms

Indianapolis, Dec. 3, 2015—The North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) passed landmark reforms today to enhance the fraternity experience and increase standards for its member organizations and the 375,000 undergraduate fraternity men across North America.

The reforms, as recommended by the NIC 2.0 Commission, were discussed through a comprehensive internal dialogue in an effort to best serve the needs of all 73 member fraternities. As a result, the NIC has established five priorities to instill trust and confidence in fraternities:

  • Create an effective grassroots program for all Interfraternity Councils (IFC) and provide exceptional support for “Focus Campuses” in an effort to strengthen and build healthier fraternity communities.
  • Develop consistent educational programming for all IFC officers, staff, and volunteers.
  • Create a database that allows members to make data-driven decisions, share best practices, and streamline operations.
  • Lead a sophisticated public relations efforts to advance the “fraternity” brand.
  • Produce effective advocacy programs that strengthen higher education partnerships and utilize governmental and legal affairs.

“This is a new day for the NIC. These actions are the product of a significant collaborative effort between fraternities and our higher education partners. We are appreciative of the commitment NIC members have made to invest in a stronger, more robust trade association that is prepared to serve the needs of the 21st century fraternity and education community,” Interim NIC President and CEO Judson Horras said. “It is a true testament of the organization’s devotion to the key cornerstones of Fraternity men: developing lifelong friendships, scholarship, and leadership skills.”

As part of a diverse and inclusive fraternal community, the NIC’s member fraternities also unanimously supported an investment in multicultural and emerging fraternities.

“I am encouraged by the NIC’s effort to advance the development of student communities,” Veronica Moore, President of the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (AFA) said. “Throughout this process, the NIC listened to the voices of our members to ensure their perspective was represented in this reorganization.”

The NIC is committed to ensuring each fraternity sets an example of academic success, service, leadership, and philanthropy. The new direction of the NIC will allow fraternities to be a vital and productive part of the educational experience both now and in the future.Indianapolis, Dec. 3, 2015—The North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) passed landmark reforms today to enhance the fraternity experience and increase standards for its member organizations and the 375,000 undergraduate fraternity men across North America.

The reforms, as recommended by the NIC 2.0 Commission, were discussed through a comprehensive internal dialogue in an effort to best serve the needs of all 73 member fraternities. As a result, the NIC has established five priorities to instill trust and confidence in fraternities:

  • Create an effective grassroots program for all Interfraternity Councils (IFC) and provide exceptional support for “Focus Campuses” in an effort to strengthen and build healthier fraternity communities.
  • Develop consistent educational programming for all IFC officers, staff, and volunteers.
  • Create a database that allows members to make data-driven decisions, share best practices, and streamline operations.
  • Lead a sophisticated public relations efforts to advance the “fraternity” brand.
  • Produce effective advocacy programs that strengthen higher education partnerships and utilize governmental and legal affairs.

This is a new day for the NIC. These actions are the product of a significant collaborative effort between fraternities and our higher education partners. We are appreciative of the commitment NIC members have made to invest in a stronger, more robust trade association that is prepared to serve the needs of the 21st century fraternity and education community,” Interim NIC President and CEO Judson Horras said. “It is a true testament of the organization’s devotion to the key cornerstones of Fraternity men: developing lifelong friendships, scholarship, and leadership skills.”

As part of a diverse and inclusive fraternal community, the NIC’s member fraternities also unanimously supported an investment in multicultural and emerging fraternities.

I am encouraged by the NIC’s effort to advance the development of student communities,” Veronica Moore, President of the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (AFA) said. “Throughout this process, the NIC listened to the voices of our members to ensure their perspective was represented in this reorganization.”

The NIC is committed to ensuring each fraternity sets an example of academic success, service, leadership, and philanthropy. The new direction of the NIC will allow fraternities to be a vital and productive part of the educational experience both now and in the future.